8 MINUTES
8 M:NUTES Creative Learning Resource
Scale square.jpg

SCALE

 

 

 

SCALE

  SCALE   During the creation process for 8 Minutes Alexander Whitley was struck by the contrasting scales many scientists are working with. For example, on a visit to the Rutherford Appleton Space Laboratory he saw scientists working with microscopes on the tiniest bits of machinery they would then send up on missions into space. This was then contrasted with the huge scale of the universe and solar system itself which can feel incomprehensible.   We have therefore created two lesson plans (tiny dances and big dances) within this overarching theme of Working with Scale. 

SCALE

During the creation process for 8 Minutes Alexander Whitley was struck by the contrasting scales many scientists are working with. For example, on a visit to the Rutherford Appleton Space Laboratory he saw scientists working with microscopes on the tiniest bits of machinery they would then send up on missions into space. This was then contrasted with the huge scale of the universe and solar system itself which can feel incomprehensible. 

We have therefore created two lesson plans (tiny dances and big dances) within this overarching theme of Working with Scale. 

   
  
 
  
    
  
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   WORKING WITH SCALE: CREATING TINY DANCES         Talk about the work of a choreographer. Talk about the work of a scientist and the way they look at tiny things, particles and atoms for example, to understand how huge things like the solar system and the universe work. Explore some of the dimensions you know about – the size of atoms and the size of the sun or moon.       

WORKING WITH SCALE: CREATING TINY DANCES

 

Talk about the work of a choreographer. Talk about the work of a scientist and the way they look at tiny things, particles and atoms for example, to understand how huge things like the solar system and the universe work. Explore some of the dimensions you know about – the size of atoms and the size of the sun or moon. 

 

 

 Watch the film:  Creative Process

Watch the film: Creative Process

 Standing in a circle, ask each person in your group to think of one very small movement each. You could identify which part of the body you would like them to move - the hand, arm, foot or leg for example or keep it free. Go around the circle, one by one, asking each person to demonstrate their movement and have the class replicate each one. Invite direction from the movement’s creator to help you perform it correctly.  Stress the possibility of using things other than hands/feet.   

Standing in a circle, ask each person in your group to think of one very small movement each. You could identify which part of the body you would like them to move - the hand, arm, foot or leg for example or keep it free. Go around the circle, one by one, asking each person to demonstrate their movement and have the class replicate each one. Invite direction from the movement’s creator to help you perform it correctly. 
Stress the possibility of using things other than hands/feet.

 

 Divide the class into smaller groups of 4 or 5. Ask each group to weave their small movements together to make a ‘small dance’. Ask each group to consider carefully the ways in which they might knit these movements together to make their dance seamless.  It is your choice whether you conduct this task with or without music. You could have some ambient music playing in the background for them to work to. NB: The speed of the music will likely influence the tempo of their dance so you may find there is not much variation from group to group if you use this approach.  Alternatively you could have two pieces of music on offer and ask which they would like to perform to.   

Divide the class into smaller groups of 4 or 5. Ask each group to weave their small movements together to make a ‘small dance’. Ask each group to consider carefully the ways in which they might knit these movements together to make their dance seamless. 
It is your choice whether you conduct this task with or without music. You could have some ambient music playing in the background for them to work to. NB: The speed of the music will likely influence the tempo of their dance so you may find there is not much variation from group to group if you use this approach. 
Alternatively you could have two pieces of music on offer and ask which they would like to perform to.

 

 Ask each group to perform their dances to the group. At the end of each sharing ask each group to talk about the decisions they made to construct their dance. How did they link their movements together? Were there natural reasons why one movement was linked to another? Discuss the overall effect they were trying to create. Encourage choreographers to think about feedback they might want and that might be useful to them.    After each sharing offer each group some more time to take the feedback and implement it to make their dances even better.  Come back again for a second sharing. Invite the observers to ask questions of each other and interrogate the choices the choreographers have made.    

Ask each group to perform their dances to the group. At the end of each sharing ask each group to talk about the decisions they made to construct their dance. How did they link their movements together? Were there natural reasons why one movement was linked to another? Discuss the overall effect they were trying to create. Encourage choreographers to think about feedback they might want and that might be useful to them. 


After each sharing offer each group some more time to take the feedback and implement it to make their dances even better. 
Come back again for a second sharing. Invite the observers to ask questions of each other and interrogate the choices the choreographers have made. 

 

 Watch the film:  Critique and Peer Review

Watch the film: Critique and Peer Review

 You will have now a number of short phrases of material – each made of tiny, intricate movements. Can you apply some other choreographic techniques to make these more interesting? Stillness? Repetition of all or part of the phrase?    

You will have now a number of short phrases of material – each made of tiny, intricate movements. Can you apply some other choreographic techniques to make these more interesting? Stillness? Repetition of all or part of the phrase? 

 

  WORKING WITH SCALE: CREATING BIG DANCES     Talk about the process you went through as a group when you created your tiny dances.    

WORKING WITH SCALE: CREATING BIG DANCES



Talk about the process you went through as a group when you created your tiny dances. 

 

 Standing in a circle ask each young person to cast their mind back to the previous lesson where they created a very small movement with one part of their body. Repeat the task but this time using the biggest movements they can.    

Standing in a circle ask each young person to cast their mind back to the previous lesson where they created a very small movement with one part of their body. Repeat the task but this time using the biggest movements they can. 

 

 Divide the class into smaller groups of 4 or 5. Ask each group to put their big movements together to make a ‘big dance’. Ask them to consider carefully the ways in which they might knit these movements together to make a seamless dance. They can be presented in any order so they can be free to find movements that work best next to each other.    

Divide the class into smaller groups of 4 or 5. Ask each group to put their big movements together to make a ‘big dance’. Ask them to consider carefully the ways in which they might knit these movements together to make a seamless dance. They can be presented in any order so they can be free to find movements that work best next to each other. 

 

 Ask each group to perform these dances to the group. At the end of each sharing ask each group to talk about the decisions they made to construct their dance. How did they link their movements together? Were there natural reasons why one movement was linked to another? Discuss the overall effect they were trying to create. Encourage choreographers to think about feedback they might want and that might be useful to them. Would they like to ask the group if one movement look good next to another for example?    After each sharing offer each group some more time to take the feedback and implement it to make their dances even better.    Come back again for a second sharing. Invite the observers to ask questions of each other and interrogate the choices the choreographers made. 

Ask each group to perform these dances to the group. At the end of each sharing ask each group to talk about the decisions they made to construct their dance. How did they link their movements together? Were there natural reasons why one movement was linked to another? Discuss the overall effect they were trying to create. Encourage choreographers to think about feedback they might want and that might be useful to them. Would they like to ask the group if one movement look good next to another for example? 


After each sharing offer each group some more time to take the feedback and implement it to make their dances even better. 


Come back again for a second sharing. Invite the observers to ask questions of each other and interrogate the choices the choreographers made. 

 You will have now a number of short phrases of material – each made of big and expansive movements. Can you apply some other choreographic techniques to make these more interesting? Stillness? Repetition of all or part of the phrase?    Have the other groups watch each group again. Once again ask the pupils to present their work and the ideas contained within it, describing their thought process regarding the way in which movements are linked. Invite feedback from observers.   

You will have now a number of short phrases of material – each made of big and expansive movements. Can you apply some other choreographic techniques to make these more interesting? Stillness? Repetition of all or part of the phrase? 


Have the other groups watch each group again. Once again ask the pupils to present their work and the ideas contained within it, describing their thought process regarding the way in which movements are linked. Invite feedback from observers.