8 MINUTES
8 M:NUTES Creative Learning Resource
Quotes.png

QUOTES TO SUPPORT & VALIDATE YOUR WORK

  Quotes to support and validate your work

Quotes to support and validate your work

     “You never set out to discover something new. You stumble upon it and you have the luck to recognise that what you’ve found is something very interesting,”   Duncan Haldane, recipient of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics   

 

“You never set out to discover something new. You stumble upon it and you have the luck to recognise that what you’ve found is something very interesting,” 
Duncan Haldane, recipient of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics

 

  “I think the great leaps of knowledge are made when one steps back, and forgets, and explores different things.”   Carlo Rovelli, physicist and bestselling author   

“I think the great leaps of knowledge are made when one steps back, and forgets, and explores different things.” 
Carlo Rovelli, physicist and bestselling author

 

  “{my} book offers a perspective on science that also talks about beauty and emotions – I don’t think those things should ever be separated from science”   Carlo Rovelli, physicist and bestselling author    

“{my} book offers a perspective on science that also talks about beauty and emotions – I don’t think those things should ever be separated from science” 
Carlo Rovelli, physicist and bestselling author

 

  “The way we teach science is definitely too simplified. For example, we only hear about the success stories of science and never the failures – but science is all about the failure and it’s interesting to understand why something doesn’t work.”   Leo Grasset, biologist and blogger.    

“The way we teach science is definitely too simplified. For example, we only hear about the success stories of science and never the failures – but science is all about the failure and it’s interesting to understand why something doesn’t work.” 
Leo Grasset, biologist and blogger. 

 

  “My normal day is to do pages of calculations and then throw them away. Part of what I do is accepting that I might have spent my whole life trying to prove a theory that is wrong. I hope it’s right. But you always have to accept that the opposite is possible”   Carlo Rovelli, physicist and bestselling author   

“My normal day is to do pages of calculations and then throw them away. Part of what I do is accepting that I might have spent my whole life trying to prove a theory that is wrong. I hope it’s right. But you always have to accept that the opposite is possible” 
Carlo Rovelli, physicist and bestselling author

 

  “We explore because we are curious, not because we wish to develop grand views of reality or better widgets.”   Brian Cox   

“We explore because we are curious, not because we wish to develop grand views of reality or better widgets.” 
Brian Cox

 

  “I'm comfortable with the unknown - that's the point of science. There are places out there, billions of places out there, that we know nothing about. And the fact that we know nothing about them excites me, and I want to go out and find out about them. And that's what science is. So I think if you’re not comfortable with the unknown, then it’s difficult to be a scientist… I don’t need an answer. I don’t need answers to everything. I want to have answers to find.”    Brian Cox   

“I'm comfortable with the unknown - that's the point of science. There are places out there, billions of places out there, that we know nothing about. And the fact that we know nothing about them excites me, and I want to go out and find out about them. And that's what science is. So I think if you’re not comfortable with the unknown, then it’s difficult to be a scientist… I don’t need an answer. I don’t need answers to everything. I want to have answers to find.” 
 Brian Cox

 

  “The practice of science happens at the border between the known and the unknown. Standing on the shoulders of giants, we peer into the darkness with eyes opened not in fear but in wonder.”   Brian Cox, Wonders of the Universe   

“The practice of science happens at the border between the known and the unknown. Standing on the shoulders of giants, we peer into the darkness with eyes opened not in fear but in wonder.” 
Brian Cox, Wonders of the Universe

 

  The greatest scientists are artists as well,"   Albert Einstein

The greatest scientists are artists as well," 
Albert Einstein

  “I always advocate for recess. This is where imagination often happens. That downtime is really important—kids had their time in class, so then they need time to think about something they learned in class or absorb the material in a different way by getting away from it for a period of time.”   Rex Jung, professor of neurosurgery at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque   

“I always advocate for recess. This is where imagination often happens. That downtime is really important—kids had their time in class, so then they need time to think about something they learned in class or absorb the material in a different way by getting away from it for a period of time.” 
Rex Jung, professor of neurosurgery at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque

 

  “Creativity is a new idea that has value in solving a problem, or an object that is new or useful.”   Robert DeHaan, retired Emory University cell biologist   

“Creativity is a new idea that has value in solving a problem, or an object that is new or useful.” 
Robert DeHaan, retired Emory University cell biologist

 

  “If you teach science as a process of learning, of observing and of gathering information about the way that nature works, then there's more room for incorporating creativity,”   Bill Wallace, a science teacher at Georgetown Day School in Washington, D.C   

“If you teach science as a process of learning, of observing and of gathering information about the way that nature works, then there's more room for incorporating creativity,” 
Bill Wallace, a science teacher at Georgetown Day School in Washington, D.C

 

  “In the best science investigations, it’s not the questions that are most creative, but rather how the experiment is measured and how the data are interpreted, given meaning and how students see the investigation as a component in understanding a scientific problem,”   Carmen Andrews, science specialist at Thurgood Marshall Middle School in Bridgeport, Conn.   

“In the best science investigations, it’s not the questions that are most creative, but rather how the experiment is measured and how the data are interpreted, given meaning and how students see the investigation as a component in understanding a scientific problem,” 
Carmen Andrews, science specialist at Thurgood Marshall Middle School in Bridgeport, Conn.

 

  “In science, you actually aren't concerned right off the bat about getting the right answer — nobody knows what it is. You're exploring a question we don't have answers to. That's the challenge, the adventure in it.”  Dudley Herschbach, Harvard University and a longtime leader of the board of trustees of Society for Science & the Public, publisher of Science News for Kids   

“In science, you actually aren't concerned right off the bat about getting the right answer — nobody knows what it is. You're exploring a question we don't have answers to. That's the challenge, the adventure in it.”
Dudley Herschbach, Harvard University and a longtime leader of the board of trustees of Society for Science & the Public, publisher of Science News for Kids

 

  “Everyone has the aptitude for creative thinking. You just need to broaden your thinking in ways that allow your mind to connect ideas that you might not have thought were related. A creative insight is just allowing your memory to pick up on ideas you never thought about before as being in the same context.”  Robert DeHaan, retired Emory University cell biologist   

“Everyone has the aptitude for creative thinking. You just need to broaden your thinking in ways that allow your mind to connect ideas that you might not have thought were related. A creative insight is just allowing your memory to pick up on ideas you never thought about before as being in the same context.”
Robert DeHaan, retired Emory University cell biologist